Governance

Director, Evan Koblentz

evanEvan leads the Federation’s day-to-day activities. He co-founded the Federation’s original Mid-Atlantic chapter and works as a freelance technology journalist. He wrote a book, Abacus to smartphone: The evolution of mobile and portable computing and was an adviser for the Computer History Museum’s mobile computing exhibit. Evan also participates in the computer history special-interest groups of the Society for the History of Technology and the International Federation for information Processing. He is a frequent speaker at conferences, user group meetings, and schools.

Evan has been an expert source or adviser for ArsTechnica, Bankrate.com, BBC Radio, CBS Radio New York, CNN, Esquire, Fox Business, Hackaday, IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, IEEE Spectrum, IEEE The Institute, Information & Culture, the John Mauchly estate, Marketwatch, Minyanville, Modern Marvels, MSN Money, National Geographic TV, MSNBC, NBC News, New-York Historical Society, News 12 New Jersey, NPR (KPCC/Southern California), The Philadelphia Inquirer, Reuters, San Jose Mercury News, SD Times, Slashdot TV, TechRepublic, Today, The Wall Street Journal, Yahoo Movies, and ZDnet.

Evan lives outside New York City with his girlfriend and Floppy Diskcat. When not working with vintage computers, he can be found running marathons, driving his Miata, listening to Springsteen, and raising money for cancer charities. Contact him at evan@vcfed.org or call (646) 546-9999. His personal site is www.snarc.net.

 

Board of Directors

erikErik Klein – Chairman and president

Erik Klein has been involved with computers since the 1970s and still has the receipt for his first PC, a 1981 IBM.  He has been making his living in the industry as a software developer since the mid 1980s.

Erik graduated from UCLA with a Bachelors in History, is a volunteer docent at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California and is a semi-regular consultant on vintage computing for all sorts of folks.

He is the original founder of the Vintage Computer Forums and the vintage-computer.com website which represents a good portion of his oversized collection.

By day Erik is a Chief Engineer for a major medical device manufacturer and by night Erik chairs the Federation board, runs the West Coast Vintage Computer Festival and tries to give equal time to his many other hobbies (Photography, Corvettes and more) and his family.

 

coreyCorey Cohen – Treasurer

Corey Cohen is a co-founder of the Vintage Computer Federation and has been involved professionally in the computer business since he sold his first computer game at age 12 from the shelves of a local computer shop in Long Island, New York.  He balanced his time in those early years between computers, acting, competitive vocalist competitions and attending school.

Corey is a world-renowned Apple-1 expert who has assisted some of the largest museums in the world with creating vintage computer exhibits.  He is a frequent TV guest when extremely rare vintage computing technology is brought up for auction and is often requested by public auction houses to authenticate and restore vintage technology. Corey is actively involved in the preservation, restoration, and history of 1970s hobbyist computers such as the MITS Altair, Apple-1, Sol-20 and Scelbi computers.  As a former HP engineer, he also has an interest in restoring vintage HP scientific calculators from the 1970’s and 80’s. His web site is MyAppleComputer.net.

Corey resides in New Jersey with his wife and two children. Beside his work with vintage technology, he is a Senior Director of Product Management at CA Technologies and is co-inventor of various patents in the computer field. He is also an avid collector of Porsche vehicles and a fan of high school and college lacrosse.

 

braceJeffrey Brace – Vice-president

Jeff Brace graduated from Drexel University with a bachelor’s degree in Computer Information Systems in 1996. He worked as a database programmer for five years and was a Taekwondo instructor for 13 years. He is currently working towards a master’s degree in elementary education. His first computer was a Commodore 64. Now he’s a prolific collector, hacker, and game programmer. He is vice-chairman of Vintage Computer Federation, docent manager for the Mid-Atlantic chapter, and project manager for the Vintage Computer Festival event series.

 

billBoard member, Bill Degnan

Bill is a co-founder of Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists, the Federation’s original Mid-Atlantic chapter. He is an hands-on hobbyist whose numerous projects are documented on his website, vintagecomputer.net. Bill has contributed photography and materials for a wide range of well-known projects including the television show Innovation Nation with Mo Rocca and the movie X-MEN Apocalypse.

Bill has given numerous classic computing-related talks at 2600 Magazine HOPE, Vintage Computer Festival, Philadelphia Area Computer Society, and the Trenton Computer Festival. He is also a former adjunct professor at the University of Delaware. His class titled History and Preservation of Microcomputing was popular among computer engineering students. Since 1995 he has owned and operated an Internet consulting firm.

Bill lives near Philadelphia with his wife Kelcey and his three children.

 

brutmanBoard member, Michael Brutman

Michael was first exposed to microcomputers in 1981.  The machines became larger and faster over the years but the same basic fascination is still present decades later.

Michael has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the State University of New York College at Oswego and a Master of Computer Science degree from the University of Minnesota. Professional projects have included operating systems programming for the IBM AS/400 (iSeries) midrange computers, control systems programming for the IBM BlueGene/L supercomputer, embedded firmware for hard drives at Western Digital/HGST, and helping to run large services at Google. Michael has contributed to five US patents and is a member of the Association of Computing Machinery and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

Personal projects include documenting the quirks of the IBM PCjr and mTCP, an open source TCP/IP stack and applications for early IBM compatible personal computers.